the journey

Almost 100 years later and the UGA is still pushing to prepare young Black Golfers to achieve success on the many Professional Tours

United Golfers Association (UGA) [Founded in 1925] is a 501C3 - non-profit organization that is committed to increasing the introduction, development and advancement of Black youth and adults within the sport of golf. The UGA Developmental Golf Academy will provide these golfers with the resources and direction to cultivate their passion for the sport as competitors and professionals in the industry. The UGA Golf Academy is designed to prepare them mentally, physically and professionally to compete as Future Tour Players and Golf Professionals throughout the world.

SPONSOR A TOUR PLAYER

Now is the time for you to help give them the support they deserve, as well as the hope they have always wanted.  Today, you can donate money to a professional tour players dreams and eliminate most of their financial burdens by contributing to their expenses that include; tournament entry fees, accommodations, flights, rental cars, gas, diet, and so much more by simply clicking the button below. 

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HISTORY OF UGA

United Golfers Association (UGA) was founded in 1925 by and for Black Golfers as a parallel institution to the all-white Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) that formed nine years earlier in 1916. Along with many other activities, the UGA operated a national golf tour for professionals, amateurs, and intercollegiate golfers, and it continued to host events well after the desegregation of the PGA in 1961.

UGA Membership

RACE TO 2K

our goal is to have 2000 UGA Members

by March 31, 2021.

#UGA2K 

**CLICK BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION**
Our MISSION

The mission of the UGA is to foster an inclusive culture for black golfers and contributing to the evolution of the sport by offering resources to golf professionals, tour players, golf enthusiasts, and youth in golf.

We’re in this together.

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"The main thing that’s missing for young African-American players is training,” said Lee Elder, the first black to play in the Masters. “We need some kind of training ground that will support minority golfers who want to take their games to the highest level.”

- Lee Elder

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REMOVING BARRIERS AND OPENING DOORS